Illegal content row: Russia extends punitive Twitter slowdown until May 15

Illegal content row: Russia extends punitive Twitter slowdown until May 15



MOSCOW (Reuters) – said on Monday it would extend a punitive slowdown of until May 15 though it acknowledged the U.S. company had speeded up deletion of banned content.


Moscow has traditionally taken a more hands-off role in policing the internet than neighbouring China. But as friction has grown this year over the arrest and jailing of Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny, it has signalled a tougher line.



has since March impeded the speed of for not removing content it deems illegal, and threatened to block it entirely. Photos and videos take longer to load for some users.


However, in a statement on Monday, state communications watchdog Roskomnadzor said had held talks with Russian authorities on April 1, resulting in an agreement to give it more time and a recognition that banned content was being deleted quicker.


On average, Twitter was removing illegal content within 81 hours of receiving a request, the watchdog said in statement. That is still much longer than the 24 hours demanded in law.


Twitter did not immediately respond to a request for comment.


Russian authorities have accused Twitter and others this year of failing to delete posts that Moscow said illegally urged children to take part in anti-Kremlin protests.


Roskomnadzor says it wants Twitter to delete content that contains child pornography, drug abuse information and calls for minors to commit suicide.


Twitter denies allowing its platform to be used to promote illegal behaviour, says its has a zero-tolerance policy for child sexual exploitation and prohibits the promotion of suicide or self-harm.


After announced the move to slow down its traffic, Twitter said it was worried about the impact on free speech.


As well as Russia, major have been embroiled in an increasing number of disputes around the globe as governments seek to curb their power.


 


(Reporting by Tom Balmforth, Maxim Rodionov, Alexander Marrow; Editing by Alison Williams and Andrew Cawthorne)

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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