Three women among four Sikhs killed at FedEx facility; shooter bought two more guns despite having one seized – Times of India

Three women among four Sikhs killed at FedEx facility; shooter bought two more guns despite having one seized – Times of India


Amarjeet Johal strove to care for her three grandchildren during daylight hours when their parents were out working. Amarjit Sekhon, a mother of two sons, was the sole breadwinner of the family after her husband was disabled. Jasvinder Kaur sent money to her son living in India.
The three women — among the four Sikhs who were mowed down by a long gunman at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis on Thursday night, were face of a industrious, resourceful community that has been the victim of racial discrimination and hate crimes for more than a century — from the time they emigrated to America at the turn of the 1900s to the 9/11 attack in 2001 and thereafter.
Community activists say FBI hate crime data shows Sikhs to be one of the most commonly targeted religious groups in America — behind Jews and Muslims. They cite a 2013 study led by the Stanford Innovation Lab and the Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund that found 70% of Americans misidentified Sikhs when shown a Sikh man in a picture, with many believing they were Muslim.
It is not clear yet if Brendon Hole, the white teenager who killed eight people, specifically targeted Sikhs. He had worked at the facility that was widely known to employ a large number of Sikhs.
But one thing is apparent: He had easy access to guns — all too easy.
His victims may have dodged Covid but they could not escape America’s endemic gun violence facilitated by the proliferation of weapons and lax monitoring of its purchase.
Authorities now say Hole was in possession of two legally purchased assault rifles at the time of the attack, despite having raised red flags earlier after his mother reported him to the police and a weapon was confiscated from his home.
While that weapon was not returned to him pending psychological evaluation under Indiana law, he was still able to go and buy two more guns — a loophole local officials are now calling to be closed.
Too little, too late, as far as the victims and their families are concerned.
Still, the latest carnage has led to calls to strengthen gun control laws on top of executive actions by President Biden and two House bills that would lengthen the review period for background checks and make them mandatory for all gun sales and transfers.
March for Our Lives, a group formed in 2018 after a shooting in which 17 students and staff were killed in a Florida high school, is planning to bring students to Washington this week to press lawmakers for more stringent laws. Moms Demand Action, another gun-control group, which recently completed a 16,000-mile road trip across the country to advocate for legislation expanding background checks for firearms purchases, is also raising the pitch. More lawmakers are drafting gun control legislation.
But no one is holding their breath — certainly not the eight fatalities, victims as much of America’s love affair with guns as they may have been of an unhinged attack, racial or otherwise.



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